Choros VI – Spectator Training with Gabrielle Cram 29.11.2018

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Photo: © Rasmus Bell

29.11.2018, ab 14.30 Uhr

Somatic Spectator Training with Gabrielle Cram

In the installation setting of Choros VI
District Berlin, Bessemerstraße 2-14 12103 Berlin

Registration: ms@moritzmajcesandraman.com

Spectator Training (Open Level) is an applied space and movement practice within the installational setting of Choros VI and which seeks to sensitize your own body for space, relationships and gravity. In an explorative way and through simple scores and practices stemming from body work together with the performers we will investigate the kinesthetic experiencing of the existing performance in the shared space in our own bodies. Like that we draw attention to our own sensing as a form of active participation and tune it for possible (relational) modes of reception. The idea of the offered practice is a body-based spatial preparation, which consciously seeks to augment, deepen and alter the potentialities of being a “spectator”. It is directed at all interested and doesn’t require any previous knowledge. Languages spoken are English and German.

Gabrielle Cram, born in Falkirk, Scotland, lives and works as Dramaturge for Contemporary Dance and Performance in Vienna. Her research focuses on transpersonal agency within transmedia alliances and her applied movement research on mixed abled strategies. She is certified DanceAbility instructor, a movement form based on the principles of early Contact Improvisation and which understands the multiplicity, singularity and diversity of the dancing bodies from their potentiality within. The engagement in transdisciplinary fields and practices of translation—between genres, spaces, times, locations, languages—takes an important role in her work. Her practice is marked by diverse forms of mediation such as the creation of spaces for negotiation and contact zones for still open processes.

From 2014-17 she held the position of head of dramaturgy and research at choreographic centre Tanzquartier Vienna and she is member of collective ttp–Dance Theatre Performance (production, training and research) WUK. She works as translator, artist and as curator e.g. as Curator for Performance and Performative Expressions at electronic music and progressive performance festival donaufestival Krems (2012-14) and as a project curator for Vienna based art foundation Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (2005-08). Her research focuses on the fields of unlearning in the context of de-colonial practices, narrative hacking and transculturality. She studied a combination of Romanistics, Art History and Theatre, Film and Media Studies at University Vienna as well as Conceptual Art and Cultural Studies at Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. https://cominghome.dance

Choros VI – 28.-30. November 2018 @ District, Berlin

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Photo: © Moritz Majce + Sandra Man, 2018

28 Nov, 29 Nov and 30 Nov 2018
District Berlin, Bessemerstraße 2-14 12103 Berlin

Installation opens at 6pm
Performance starts at 7pm
Tickets from 6pm at box office: €10 / 8

Facebook-Event here

28.11. after the performance with wine on the grass:
Talk with Jacopo Lanteri (Curator and Dramaturg) on Choreography as space art and the role of the spectator

29.11. starting 2.30pm:
Somatic Spectator Training with Gabrielle Cram
Info: blog.moritzmajcesandraman.com
Reservations: ms@moritzmajcesandraman.com

30.11. after the performance with wine on the grass:
Talking Cure with Elisabeth Schäfer (Philosopher)

In Choros VI the earth is a foreign planet. People come together in a space station. They enter, visit, explore the area. They move through the past, the present and the future. Times are fragile, mortality is in the future, what is yet to come is waiting in the past, the present collides with the origin. Layers of images, texts and movements reveal a myth in which geometry and nature, gait and gaze, desert and water are the recurrent motives.

Since 2016 the Choros series deals with space and choir. First, it is a group walking together and speaking, forming space around an audience. Choros IV adds a series of videos, exploring movements in image spaces – many bodies in black nothingness, body parts in white nothingness, single bodies in nature. Choros V is focusing on the spatial and corporeal relations among the six performers and between them and various grounds: grass, trampolines, sand.

From the very first Choros is work on origin: In archaic times a group met at a holy place, danced and stomped a round spot in the ground. The word “Choros” is the ancient name for this ritual assembly on the soil. It refers both to the bodies, their movements as well as the site where the participants do all of this. Choros brought forth the roundel and the choir, the dance floor, and choreography.

Choros VI is about times in which cycles considered to be unchangeable start to leave the track. Seasons, weather situations, climatic conditions are changing the earth dramatically. Right in high tech 21st century people are suddenly re-discovering nature, staring in disbelieve at burning forests, flooded coasts, deserted landscapes, as if they had landed on a foreign planet. The earth, the soil on which they believed to be home based, is slipping away under their feet. New uninhabitable and uncultivated sites emerge. What are they going to do with them?

IDEA, SPACE, VIDEO, TEXT: Moritz Majce + Sandra Man PERFORMANCE AND CHOREOGRAPHY WITH: Zoé Alibert, Tamar Grosz, Friederike Heine, Julia B. Laperrière, Sonia Noya, Laura Siegmund STIMMEN: Sergiu Matis, Katharina Meves, Frank Willens INSTALLATION BUILDING: Robert Grap, Olli Opitz PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT: Katharina Wallisch OUTSIDE EYE: Gabrielle Cram ENGLISH TRANSLATION: Anna Galt

A production by Moritz Majce + Sandra Man, in co-operation with WUK performing arts, funded by the Berlin Senate for Culture and Europe, Vienna Culture, Land Kärnten Kultur. With the kind support of District Berlin and Tanzfabrik Berlin.

Communication program with the kind support of mapping dance berlin – a project by Tanzbüro Berlin.

Thanks to Joris Camelin for his inspiring workshop on voicing and spatial somatics.

District Berlin • Bessemerstraße 2-14 3 • 12103 Berlin
Admission: € 10 / 8 • www.district-berlin.com

A New Sensualism

A new sensualism is emerging in this time of globalisation, a time when the globe is recreating itself. It is hard to imagine anything more elementary. It is not only that something is changing while everything else stays the same, rather it is a transformation of everything, including the nature of change itself. Technology is clearly no longer an instrument but a condition – it is becoming our nature. We live in a technonature on a radically changing planet. It is characterised by a technologically triggered climate change that confronts us as natural catastrophe, and a technological environment in which we are losing social bonds, while at the same time everything and everyone is connected. It has become clear that we cannot control and plan what is going on, and that in itself is integral to what is going on. We can feel and sense this new becoming. We live it. We are not detached from this extreme planetary transformation, but are in it and are part of it. The planet is not changing without us. The transformation going on cannot be looked at and studied like an object. What is changing is changing us: what we see and how we see, what we hear and how we listen, what we feel and how we feel – how the senses make sense – is transforming itself, and that is why sensing as such is becoming so surprisingly unfamiliar, new, intense, exciting, disturbing. We are being born into the environment of a transforming planet; we are exposed to the experience of it, to living in it. In our work we aim to let ourselves be affected by the elementary change we are going through. Our pieces work with presence and sensuality to feel, hear, see this self-transforming time and space. In doing so, some of them address technology and nature explicitly, others do not. It is not important. When technology becomes natural and nature is technologically transformed, this affects our existence and our senses – always. Not only when we use devices or talk about it. The transformation goes deeper and beyond technology’s instrumental function. If a piece is about presence then it is about the elementary nature of this change.

After a long period in which both works and people feel as if they are the last of a line, burdened by a certain melancholia and the heaviness of closure, of history being over, we experience an atmosphere of something else coming into existence. Indefinite beings, ones who start living and feeling in this new world, who start to be (in) technonature. That is why mere presence becomes so important in many pieces, including ours. What matters in them is the drive to open the senses, to approach our transforming existence as sincerely as possible, even innocently. On this planet which is giving birth to itself – and so to us – we are vulnerable and fragile. We are not dominant. We are not the strongest. We have the power to kill some or even many of us and a lot of life on earth, and we do so every day. But we are not life as such. There are forces in continuous motion within and without us, and we can clearly feel this today in the change and transformation that is happening around us, between us, within us, exceeding and surpassing us. We want to open ourselves to these forces and offer a space where we can get in touch with them. This changes our relationship to those who come to experience our work.

None of our pieces is ”interactive” but all of them engage with the audience and establish relationships, offer a kind of participation. The act of being present, of pure being there, happens in and as an environment. It is an environment that includes the audience, and that which appears in-between, consisting of relationships – bodies, feelings, sensations, perceptions. An environment of affects and forces to which you are exposed and connected, open to what becomes present right here and now. In this environment, another way of being an audience is emerging. It is not about what you see – neither what nor you – but about the state a piece offers. As an audience you still have to enter that state; being a spectator or visitor here does not mean staying outside, observing. From the outside you will not see. If a piece works, it does not force you into something, it gives you space and time for being. It is an offer, not a product and not a task, and it is not always happening. The pieces we are trying to make ask for a certain way of watching and being in them. A watching that is not triggered by anything interesting on the sidelines of what is being shown, and that is not an understanding on the part of the spectator. It is rather an appearing than a showing, and rather a meditation than an understanding. A watching as a state exceeding what you see and who you are as a spectator. Neither the performers nor the audience can control it, but all of them are involved in exploring a state in which watching becomes being sensually present. Our works follow a belief in presence, in sensuality, in openness. They are not critical, not ironic, not detached, not cool; neither are they personal or emotional. They are at the same time humble and risky, because they follow a drive. It is subtle and it is strong, it is a new experience of being on this planet. It is a sensual affirmation, a yes. This yes is not ignorant of violence, of injustice, of exploitation; it is not an escape from the suffering. It is charged by and opens itself up to what is stronger than any destruction. It echoes that there is something rather than nothing. This yes sounds like it is coming from somewhere else. It is the call of an adventure.

Choros V

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Model view, 2018

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Model view, 2018

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Model view, 2018

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Model view, 2018

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Model view, 2018

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Model view, 2018

Adam + Eve

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Michelangelo, La Creazione di Adamo, 1508–1512

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Albrecht Dürer, Adam und Eva, 1507

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Giovanni di Paolo, Creazione e Cacciata dal Paradiso terrestre, 1445

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Hieronymus Bosch, Garten Eden, 1500